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The revolution will not be televised. The revolution is live.

This is fascinating. I've been wondering for a while now why Jabulani Leffall has not been the voice of KCUR's "Central Standard," the show he took over a couple years ago when its long-time host Walt Bodine lost his ability to think clearly (a useful trait for a talk-show host). But the show has been hosted by others lately, none of them stating, "Filling in for Jabulani Leffall." Surely people don't take two-month vacations, so what's up? So I asked The Google about the guy.

Turns out that his last show was on January 16, when he resigned in the last 30 seconds or so. The Pitch has a very interesting article about his resignation and the interviews they did with him: "Leffall steered the conversation into strange territory, referencing race, eavesdropping, space aliens and God's existence." Whoah, cool. Wish he'd talked more about his visions and paranoia than the just chatting through the tedious shows he usually hosted. Got me wondering if maybe this particular show makes people lose their minds.

The Kansas City Star's story has a flattering interview with him, including these insights:

"The objectivity we learn as bright-eyed, bushy-tailed journalism students, after a while you discover it's illusive. It's a lie. Journalism is changing. Questions need to be approved before asked; advertisers need to be placated. It's about ratings and Internet hits and business relationships ... Who wants to be a journalist in this environment? ... This is not what I signed up for, and it's certainly not what I should still be paying student loans for."

He's planning to pursue his creative interests, including music and writing. At the end of the Star's story, he sums up his feelings: "Your job is not your life, and what you do is not as important as who you are."


Click the image to see the Star article (this shot is from Lefall's spoken-word album).

Maybe the guy is crazy, maybe not. Then again, I've been toying with a hypothesis that we're all crazy: That is, every one of us has some issue that prevents us from being happy or being accepted by others or fitting in or whatever - something that makes us different, that others fear or loathe or can't understand. If everyone is crazy, then no one's crazy, right? I mean, if there's no standard for sane, the words become meaningless.

Quitting a job that makes you unhappy, that makes you feel like you're just a tool of a machine, seems the sane thing to do.

Interesting how it took his resigning in this way to get me to admire the man.

Chris

Comments

( 13 comments — Leave a comment )
msmitti
Mar. 20th, 2013 04:50 pm (UTC)
I wondered what happened to him! I didn't listen to it regularly, but it registered when his distinctive voice wasn't coming on anymore.
mckitterick
Mar. 20th, 2013 04:57 pm (UTC)
My feelings exactly!
sf_reader
Mar. 20th, 2013 07:32 pm (UTC)
I had noticed just yesterday that he wasn't on and the show sounded more interesting than the last few times I had heard him. I rarely listen to KCUR live, just downloading Friday Central Standard when they have different hosts with food critics or history. Ocasionally I download an Up To Date.

For drive time news, I listen to the Lawrence station, which has become my best source for Kansas news.
mckitterick
Mar. 20th, 2013 08:12 pm (UTC)
Good to know that the other NPR station has good stuff! All I ever seem to hear on it is classical music.
msmitti
Mar. 20th, 2013 08:59 pm (UTC)
I think KPR has morning edition and all things considered but none of the talk programming between, instead filling the time with classical music.
sf_reader
Mar. 20th, 2013 09:36 pm (UTC)
It also has Star Date and most of the same weekend shows that KCUR does, including my favorite, "Whad'Ya Know?,"

mckitterick
Mar. 21st, 2013 01:59 pm (UTC)
Ooh, yeah, I love Star Date!
nottygypsy
Mar. 21st, 2013 02:27 am (UTC)
Quitting a job that makes you unhappy, that makes you feel like you're just a tool of a machine, seems the sane thing to do.

Hoping to do this soon myself.
mckitterick
Mar. 21st, 2013 02:00 pm (UTC)
Good luck on finding something and a workplace that you love!
philrancid
Mar. 21st, 2013 01:35 pm (UTC)
Quitting a job that makes you unhappy, that makes you feel like you're just a tool of a machine, seems the sane thing to do.

AAGH DO NOT SAY THIS NOW!!

*bitter, wry, rueful laughter*
mckitterick
Mar. 21st, 2013 05:08 pm (UTC)
Well, perhaps now is the time to hear it. Sounds like you pretty much despise your job... well, I think Lefall simply walking out on his job without financial backup is a bit unsound, but if he can keep from growing panicked about having no money, he ought to be able to put tons of creative energy into his creative pursuits. If you can do the same, why not?

This is why so many artists of all stripes have day-jobs (or night-jobs as the case may be) that don't sap their creative energy. It's a battle for me, because most everything I do for my day-job requires a lot of that. Still, I've been working hard to put my writing first, and getting way better at that.

Whatever you decide to do, good luck!
garyomaha
Mar. 21st, 2013 01:35 pm (UTC)
Interesting story. Thanks for mentioning the name "Walt Bodine."

I remember listening to Walt Bodine when I was young, visiting my grandparents in KC. He had a talk show, I think on WHB (which was a pop station during the day). It was one of the first non-music radio shows I remember listening to. To my young ears, Bodine sounded ancient back then. He must have been all of 40!! I had heard he transitioned to public radio many years later, but I never had the pleasure of hearing him there.
mckitterick
Mar. 21st, 2013 02:02 pm (UTC)
I've heard some of his older shows, and he was always a great interviewer. It was sad to see his decline in the last several years.
( 13 comments — Leave a comment )